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Thinking Out Loud

What is Value-based medicine? Is this patient or profit-centric?

By | Biopharma, Books, Communities, patient-centricity, Strategy, Thinking Out Loud, value-based medicine | No Comments

Value-Based medicine. Everyone is talking about it; biopharma is questioning what the managed market model will be when they launch new drugs, lots of hand-wringing and a fair dose of confusion (that included me, too!). So let’s use a recent Deloitte report and some CMS content to define it. What I ask is: do any of you readers see this impacting your brands today? Are people putting their heads in the sand? Are they accepting the inevitable and trying to shape it? Here’s an infographic from a Xerox company healthcare survey: After taking in that content and facts from the survey, it seems that uncertainty as to whom Value-based serves is greater than the end goal of better quality care…

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Melanoma rages, ASCO raves, families cry, patients wait and hope hope hope.

By | Thinking Out Loud, Uncategorized | No Comments

Yesterday my family, which runs a local melanoma foundation that is associated with WISTAR Institute (a truly great foundational science group), had our annual 5K run/walk we call Run4Cover. Our 9th year. If you do not know about WISTAR — and the amazing Dr. Meenhard Herlyn in the center of the poster — then you should. And if you are not keeping your kids (or yourself) off the tanning bed and have not matured past the Sun Worship stage, then shame on you. Seriously. This is such a common sense preventable disease, but once it gets going, you are not left with a lot of options. Until now. As I volunteered at the runners registration, I saw so many family…

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Why does Fall Make Me Think of Patient Adherence?

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Well, it must be something in the air. I enjoy fall, but like most people, my enjoyment has a little bit of melancholy as well. Thousands and thousands of writers have described this much better than I ever could, but for me, along with the leaves turning, fall also delivers that sudden feeling of disappointment when you notice the sun is going down earlier. The days are shorter, the nights are colder and longer. Winter is on the way, and here in New England, that means something. The most ancient, mechanical process in the universe has the power to provoke strong, deep-seated, equally ancient feelings. Professionally, the slow decay of fall reminds me that this is the consequence for many…

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Getting Serious About Adherence

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Great post today from John Mack’s Pharma Marketing Blog today about adherence. First, Mach cites an amazing 2003 World Health Organization report on the problem that estimates that worldwide, something like 30% to 50% of medications prescribed  aren’t taken as directed. This reminds us of Lord Leverhume’s famous observation about advertising, that 50% of his advertising was being wasted, but he didn’t know which 50%. The WHO report, although five years old, is a comprehensive review of the adherence problem all around the world. You can download it here. Mack then goes on to introduce us to what seems to be a less-than-serious adherence tool — a collar that, when worn, senses when pills have been swallowed. This requires, however,…

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RM In the News — Again

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Last week it was nurses. This week it’s pharmacists. Either way, RM is emerging, bit by bit, as the weapon of choice for holding down healthcare costs. Or at least, so says the Wall Street Journal. In a story yesterday, the Journal reported on a trial program written up in the Archives of Internal Medicine. In a dozen tracked, randomized trials, regular consultations with pharmacists significantly reduced hospitalization rates for patients with heart failure. Although the role of the pharmacists varies, generally they help patients stay on their meds, and monitor their basic condition. A similar trial is under way for diabetic patients in 10 cities across the country, in which pharmacists coach diabetics. Both diabetes and heart failure are…

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Service Is The Most Ignored Form of Efficacy II

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We have posted previously about how pharma companies need to begin to understand the importance of servicing their patients. Well, in today’s Wall Street Journal Health blog, Walgreen’s seems to have gone one better at this, by making an acquisition that enables them to begin putting healthcare centers in the workplace. This merits a closer look. Here’s the relevant part of the story: Walgreen execs said yesterday that the company’s buying a shop called I-trax for about $260 million and another company called Whole Health Management for an undisclosed amount, the WSJ reports. After the deal goes through, Walgreen will have more than 500 health centers, including both its existing retail clinics and the on-site health centers its buying, the…

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Internal Noise and Relationship Marketing

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Explaining to traditional pharma marketers what relationship marketing is and how it works is tricky sometimes. In a post yesterday entitled "That Noise Inside My Head" Seth Godin provides a really nice metaphor for explaining RM. Godin poses the simple, yet difficult, question: "Why don’t people do what they know they should?" In other words, and I’m going to quote Godin here: Why do people struggling for an income end up using an expensive check cashing service when the bank right next door will let them have a checking account for free? Why do students spend an hour fighting about their homework instead of ten minutes just doing it? Why do customers fall for slick come ons or fancy financing…

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